Did you know that most of us lose 80% of the information we learn in just 48 hours? Not only is there a learning curve, but there is also a forgetting curve. One way to remember more and learn effectively is note-taking. I was just listening to Jim Kwik's podcast, where he shares tricks for successful note-taking. I made a visual about it but will also point out some steps.

  • Learning is not a passive process — so be active during learning;
  • Know why you are studying and taking notes —know your purpose!
  • Be organized and prioritize things;
  • Create a…

There is a common opinion that scribbling — aimless doodling or pattering is a good strategy for learning. Quite a number of experiences have shown that it scares away boredom, helps to concentrate, and be in present. That it is better to scribble than do nothing while listening to important information.

However, researchers from Canada have proven the opposite. Scribbling does not help memorize information. So, let's talk about this research.

In 2018 (the study was published in 2019), Meade, Wammes, and Fernandes studied drawing, scribbling, conscious doodling, and note-taking as tools for better learning and memorizing information. They point…


What if you looked at the drawing from a completely different angle?

“In the drawing, is it only important to have the result, the beautiful picture as a product, or can drawing as a process be seen as an activity that supports development, improves thinking and communication skills?”

This was the question that Maria Papandreou, an associate professor of primary education in Greece, asked.

Papandreou introduces the idea, published by Gardner in 1973, that drawing should be seen as a sign system and studied in this way. Various authors point out that drawing is one of the languages ​​that children…


I just discovered that I have forgotten to write a blog. Literally, I forgot it. But the main reason is my studies. I am writing a Master's Thesis and have to finish within a month. As the times have been so hectic due to all this Corona mess, it is time to get myself together and finish the Thesis. Now, when I have also done the study part and analysis, it is really interesting for further action. I will definitely share the results but till then…. I try to treat you with few posts :)

Last year, I discovered that…


This sentence belongs to J.Piaget and B.Inhelder and I took it from Joseph H. Di Leo’s book “Children’s Drawings as a Diagnostic Tool” (1973) which is a very interesting and useful read to all who are curious about the deeper meaning of drawing. Especially for those who want and need to help children with learning difficulties or developmental disabilities. I have to be honest that I didn't read through the whole book, only the first part, chapters 1–7. Because those were useful for my topic and research and from there, it became very specific about the treatment of arch disorders…


In the previous post about myself, I also mentioned that I am coming from the AOH community. Just to mention again: the Art of Hosting is an approach to leadership that scales up from the personal to the systemic using personal practice, dialogue, facilitation, and the co-creation of innovation to address complex challenges.

People experience meaningful conversations when they are present, when they participate, when they are hosted and when they co-create something. That is why The Art of Hosting is predicated on a very simple set of practices which are called the Four-Fold Practice. I made a visual of…


From the beginning of time, people have longed to leave a mark to make their presence known. It is a well-known fact that humanity has scribbled for centuries. Researchers of cave paintings point out that these drawings shared very important information — warned of the dangers, showed where the food is located, and so on.

Drawing is part of being human.

Before the child starts talking, not to mention the reading, he starts drawing. Every child has drawn lines and often in places that parents do not like very much (yes, even without paper and pencil). And if children’s drawing…


So, I will continue the last post about myself. I have to be honest- I can't wait to have it done cos as interesting it may be for me to write or for you to read about Kati Orav, I want to dig into the main reason for this blog which is visual practices and graphic facilitation, research and thoughts about it and how to bring it into education. I also feel that preparing those personal posts haven't been so inspiring to me and they have taken so long time.

The next posts will be all about the focus, I…


“I can’t do it, it is impossible” has never been my style.
“How it is possible?” has always been my way of seeing life.

So, I promised to write a little about myself. And then I started to think- what would be the most relevant to share? I thought so deeply that probably overthought many times. The post should have been published several weeks ago but I just couldn't get started. …


… and do not just write them down in linear text. Take the pen and paper and DRAW the real map of how to get there. It is like driving by car to somewhere for the very first time. You don't know the place, you just know the address. What do you do? In old times we used to have real maps, so it was easier to have someone sitting next to you and telling you what turn to take next, where to turn left or right, and so on. Today you can just have your smartphone (as it has…

Kati Orav

I help people to be masters in thinking and cooperation with a mission to help people rediscover two innate abilities — scribbling and imagination.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store